Nuthampstead Airfield Museum

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30 Comments

Reply Merlinjaphy
2:55 PM on August 11, 2017 
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Reply Frank Fitzgerald
1:42 PM on July 23, 2017 
I am a member of a group of Walkers. We did a walk today which included a stop at the pub in Nuthampstead. When I got home I decided to do a bit of research on this USAAS Airbase.

One thing in particular puzzles me: "The forestry commission planted conifers on the site of the bomb-store". Where was this bomb-store and does anyone have any idea why the Forestry Commission chose to plant a very distinctibe long line of conifers - presumably over it?

Next time I am in the area I will make a point of visiting the museum.
Reply Chuck Cole
4:28 PM on April 7, 2017 
My brother (Tom Cole) served in the 398th bomb group flying out of Nuthampstead. The years were 1944 & 45
I have followed the web site and have sent him messages etc. Tom is now in his 90s and not in real good health so what ever I can send him I do. Thanks for your willingness in keeping your site up and running. I hope you get the museum paid for. I wish I could help but that is impossible at this time. Thank you, Chuck Cole
Reply 398th President
4:56 PM on May 3, 2016 
Please let us know when you are coming over. Follow our progress on our Facebook group page
https://www.facebook.com/groups/187778531251719/

David Funk says...
My Uncle, Lt Col. Roy M. Sheely (Ret) (Deceased), was stationed at Nuthampstead as a 1st Lt., Aircraft Commander, and piloted aircraft tail number N7-R 48199 on October 28 th 1944 on a bombing mission to Munster. On the way back after dropping all the ordanance, they were struck by flak and lost three engines with the fourth on fire. Lt. Sheely brought the aircraft down to 5000 ft and the entire crew bailed out . He then put the aircraft on autopilot and bailed out himself over Sevenaar, Holland. Lt. SHeely was immediately taken prisoner by a Panzer SS division Major. After 18 days in solitary confinement he was dumped into Stalag Luft III and spent the rest of the war there, eventually being freed by General Patton's tank corps. All 10 crew members survived the day of the bail out but two were killed on subsequent missions. I am happy your museum is coming to reality and someday wish to visit the place my Uncle and his squadron so vallantly fought from. Best of luck!
Reply 398th President
4:55 PM on May 3, 2016 
Thanks! We are opening the second building 28th of May and will be open beginning in June on the second and last Sunday of each month from 10 till 4 until the end of September. Please come and visit.

Alexa Chipman says...
I am excited that this project will finally come into being?I came by a few years ago to deliver photos from Chet Patterson's estate and got to see the landmark. It will be wonderful to finally have a dedicated museum for Nuthampstead Airfield. Best of luck!
Reply 398th President
4:53 PM on May 3, 2016 
The museum is next to the Woodman Inn. It will be open starting 28th of May. Beginning in June, it will be open the second and last Sunday of each month through September. Please stop by next time you fly in to Nuthampstead!

Dave Broughall says...
I flew into Nuthampstead yesterday,08 06 13,I didnt know there was a museum,nor did I see one,is it located in the hanger ? I did,however wander down the old runway to the Woodman,had a very nice lunch of crayfish salad and a long look at the pictures therein of the squadron and the planes which are numerouse There are also two memorials just outside the pub.There were also some very pleasant model flyers mid runway by the concrete patch and we stopped and had a chat with them, All in all a very pleasant day.
Reply David Funk
1:19 PM on February 15, 2016 
[/David Funk]
I will be sending Maartin Poleman an email today hoping he is still well and has additional information for me on the Sheely Crew. Uncle Roy's wife Janet is still very much alive and kicking at 95 years young. She gave me the artifacts during my recent visit as well as her founding member items. I value these items very much and have them prominently displayed in my home. I look forward to some day visiting Nuthamstead and possibly Zevenaar. Thanks to the Poleman family, I have a small piece of history.
Reply David Funk
12:46 PM on February 15, 2016 
Maarten Polman says...
@ David Funk

My name is Maarten Polman, living in Zevenaar Holland. Just near the crash site of the B-17 of Sheely Crew. My dad has done research on it in the 80's. Unfortunately now for him impossible due to a stroke.
If you (or the museum) would like any info about their crash and where the were held prisoner in Zevenaar, I 'd be happy to help you.

Just sent me an email for contact: maarten. [email protected]
Reply Maarten Polman
7:36 AM on September 11, 2014 
@ David Funk

My name is Maarten Polman, living in Zevenaar Holland. Just near the crash site of the B-17 of Sheely Crew. My dad has done research on it in the 80's. Unfortunately now for him impossible due to a stroke.
If you (or the museum) would like any info about their crash and where the were held prisoner in Zevenaar, I 'd be happy to help you.

Just sent me an email for contact: maarten. [email protected]
Reply Bob Rini
1:35 PM on September 10, 2014 
2/Lt. Albert A. Albino--my Uncle Albert--was stationed at Nuthampstead. He flew a P38 with the 55th Fighter Group and 38th Fighter Squadron, and was killed in action over Occupied Holland on November 29th, 1943. For years he was listed as Missing in Action, until his remains were discovered in 1978 by Dutch workers digging a train tunnel. According to eyewitnesses, after his plane was hit he directed it at the main train tracks to stop the flow of German war supplies, but the Germans built tracks right over him. As of last year, the Dutch put up a memorial to him in the same train station consisting of a single blade of his propeller.
http://www.station131.co.uk/55th/Pilots/38th%20Pilots/Albino%20Al
bert%20A%20Lt.htm

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